Early Preview of Gnome Shell 3.14 On Ubuntu GNOME 14.10

GNOME 3.14 is releasing in September and Ubuntu-GNOME in October, therefore this is an early access to the development versions of both of them. However Ubuntu development releases are quite stable and the same also applies for GNOME, so it should be a very usable system.

Running GNOME in Ubuntu won’t give a genuine GNOME experience and not all things work as supposed to, but on the other hand Ubuntu will give you the best out of Linux desktop the term is wrong in general, meaning easy access to all available software, free and no-free. Something you should keep on mind if you prefer GNOME over Unity is that is recommended to install Ubuntu GNOME and not Ubuntu and install GNOME after. The interplay of the two desktops when we add GNOME PPAs is really bad. Also getting GNOME from official PPAs of Ubuntu, it is a poor GNOME “clone” and additionally it would be an old version too. It isn’t very good idea to make a judgement out of it. It isn’t even a worth to try it like this.

Get latest GNOME On Ubuntu GNOME

That involves three steps. Download Ubuntu GNOME, add PPAs and reboot.

You will need to download one of the daily Ubuntu GNOME images. To burn the ISO you can watch this YouTube guide.

Prefer the 64bit architecture and if you have an UEFI, boot the USB from there. Install as normal and update the system.

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade

Every time that upgrade will keep packages back, try dist-upgrade.

sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

Then add the PPAs.

We are going to use the bleeding edge snapshots. Two things.

  1. Read the details on PPAs
  2. You have to know how to use ppa-purge and apt-get

PPA-purge disables a PPA and reverts to the official packages if applicable. The syntax is very simple

sudo ppa-purge the-PPA-to-remove

The PPAs you need to add are:

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:gnome3-team/gnome3
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:gnome3-team/gnome3-staging
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:ricotz/testing

After that, update

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade //or dist-upgrade

You’re done, just reboot!


Overall

GNOME is depended in some degree on GNOME-Software, and GNOME-Software isn’t available in repositories. GNOME Software helps us to create Application-Folders in Shell, makes applications easily discover-able from Shell through a search provider, and more.

ubuntu-software-center

 

In general there are some smaller issues as well (eg theming, gsettings, super+right click, and others), missing software and not all GNOME modules aren’t updated to the latest (yet). Ofcourse this is still an early release (technically not even release!).

For now just a screencast. Open Source and proprietary in perfect harmony with a single click in Ubuntu!

Ubuntu GNOME with the Testing PPAs at the moment has many many bugs concerning GNOME implementation that don’t happen for example in Fedora 21.


A last thing you should know is that GNOME 3.14 is going to bring huge improvements, so it is a worth to update to it.

As a matter of fact is always important to update on the latest desktop releases no matter what Linux desktop you’re using. They all do bring many many improvements that make your life easier. Easier means less nerves -happier 🙂

via Early Preview | Shell 3.14 On Ubuntu GNOME 14.10 | woGue.

How to Capture a Screenshot of Your LightDM Login Screen (Unity Greeter) in Ubuntu

This quick tutorial is going to show you how to capture LightDM Unity Greeter, the log in screen, in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.

Besides installing Ubuntu as a guest OS via Virtualbox or VMware Player, there’s no graphical screenshot tool to capture the log-in screen.

However, there’s simple script can do this job and below picture was taken by this method:

loginscreen

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Ubuntu Flavours (The Ubuntu Desktop Environment List)

Unity (Installed by default)

Screenshot from 2014-05-09 13:02:49

Founded in 2010, the Unity project started by Mark Shuttleworth and Canonical has gone on to deliver a consistent user experience for desktop and netbook users alike. Putting great design at the heart of the project, Unity and its technologies such as Application indicators, System indicators, and Notify OSD, have strived to solve common problems in the Free Software desktop while optimizing the experience for touch, consistency and collaboration.

Features

  • Unity is powered by Compiz.
  • The top-right portion of the panel is very similar to GNOME 2, offering support for various menus and indicators.
  • A launcher on the left side keeps track of currently-running applications, and also allows the user to pin favorite applications. Applications demanding attention will glow blue. Badges and progress bars on the launcher icons are also supported by some applications, as are quicklists revealed by right-clicking.
  • By either clicking the button in the upper-left corner or pressing the Super key, the user can open the Dash, which allows searching for applications, files, and more via the use of “lenses”.
  • Four workspaces are provided that the user can use for organizing windows.
  • A global menu enable by Default, similar to that used in Mac OS X, is used for windows by default. You can reveal the menu by mousing over the left portion of the top panel, or by holding Alt. Alternatively, in Ubuntu 14.04 onward, a locally integrated menus (LIM) inside of the windows titlebar is enableable, instead of the global menu.
  • Alternatively, in Ubuntu 12.04 LTS onward, you can tap the Alt key to reveal the HUD, which allows you to find menu commands by entering search terms, similar to the Dash.
  • Maximized windows have their window controls also integrated into the top panel. This and the global menu are intended to provide more vertical screen space as compared to other DEs / shells, which is useful for machines like netbooks where screen space is limited.

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Install Nemo 2.2.1 (With Unity Patches) In Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

Update for Ubuntu 14.04 users: I’ve updated Nemo (with Unity patches) as well as the Nemo extensions from the WebUpd8 Nemo PPA to the latest 2.2.0 version.

Screenshot from 2014-05-09 07:54:45

Nemo is the default Cinnamon file manager and normally, it needs Cinnamon to be installed, even if you want to use it in a desktop environment such as Unity or GNOME (Shell). The Nemo version in the WebUpd8 Nemo PPA uses some patches that make it work properly under Unity, without Cinnamon dependencies (the only dependency used is Cinnamon Translations). It should also work on other desktop environments, but some patches add extra Unity functionality and also I’ve only tested it under Unity.

Nemo 2.2.0 has received improvements such as: HiDPI support, a recent place sidebar item, tab switching using ctrl+(shift+)+tab, a new folder button was added to the toolbar and various bug fixes.

Install Nemo 2.2.0 in Ubuntu 14.04

Unfortunately, the latest Nemo 2.2.0 can’t be compiled successfully on Ubuntu versions older than 14.04, that’s why our PPA has Nemo 2.0.8 for Ubuntu 12.04, 12.10 and 13.10.

Important: if you’re using any Cinnamon PPA, you must purge it before using the PPA before. Also, don’t install this in Linux Mint!

To install Nemo 2.2.0 in Ubuntu 14.04, use the Nemo WebUpd8 PPA:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/nemo
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install nemo nemo-fileroller

If you already had an older Nemo version installed from our Nemo PPA, upgrade to the latest Nemo 2.2.0 using the following commands:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade
kill all
nemo

Then start Nemo from the Dash / menu (note that it shows up as “Files”, like Nautilus, but if you search for “Nemo”, the “Files” app that shows up should be Nemo).

The PPA also has some Nemo extensions, to install them, search for “nemo” in Ubuntu Software Center or Synaptic.

A lot more about Nemo: various tweaks, extensions, how to set Nemo as the default file manager in Ubuntu, etc., in our previous article: Install Nemo With Unity Patches (And Without Cinnamon Dependencies) In Ubuntu (I strongly suggest you read that article before installing Nemo!)

via Install Nemo 2.2.0 (With Unity Patches) In Ubuntu 14.04 LTS ~ Web Upd8: Ubuntu / Linux blog.

Get the Most from Your Terminal with Tabs and Other Customizations

Modern Linux distributions try to shield users from the complexities of the command-line, but there are times when using a terminal is absolutely necessary. On Ubuntu, the default terminal is the GNOME terminal (“gnome-terminal“). To start it, tap the “Super” key (which is probably the Windows key on your keyboard), type “terminal” and then click on the Terminal icon.

The word terminal comes from a previous era in computing when the connection from a computer ended (terminated) at a character-based workstation. This concept itself comes from the field of electronics where a terminal is the the end of a line where signals are either transmitted or received. Today, the terminal program is a software equivalent of those character-based workstations.

For quick one-line commands, or a quick bit of system configuration, the default terminal settings are more than adequate; however, if you spend any length of time using the terminal, you may find that you want to customize it to better fit your needs.

The simplest customization is to change the dimensions of the terminal window. By default, the terminal window has twenty-four rows with each being eighty characters wide. You can change the size by dragging any of the edges or corners. This can be a bit haphazard, so the terminal program also offers some presets. Click Terminal on the menu bar and choose between 80×24 (the default), 80×43 (a long version of the default), 132×24 (wide) and 132×43 (wide and long).

If you need another terminal session, you can start one from the launcher, or you can right-click inside the terminal window and click “Open Terminal”. If you use the second method, then the current working directory is preserved. If you have several terminal windows open then you may find that your screen is getting a little cluttered. The solution is to open terminal tabs. To open a tab, right-click inside the terminal window and click “Open Tab”. The tabs appear at the top of the window, and the title of the tabs shows the current prompt: A combination of the username, the machine name and the current directory. Tabs can be closed by clicking on the X, by using “Close Tab” from the context menu or by exiting the shell with CTRL-D.

The terminal program also has the concept of a profile. This allows you to set different preferences and remember them in a profile. Each terminal session can use a different profile. To create a profile, select “New Profile …” under the ”’File” menu. To edit a profile’s preferences use ”Profile Preferences” under the Edit menu or right-click and select “Profile Preferences” under the Profiles sub-menu.

Among the preferences are the ability to change the default font and alter the amount of scroll history that is retained. You can also set the background color and make the background semi-transparent!

If you like the tabs on the Ubuntu terminal, then you might also be interested in another terminal program called Terminator. Like the default terminal program, it allows you to open multiple sessions, but rather than using tabs, it allows the terminal windows to be split horizontally or vertically. By splitting the window multiple times, several different terminal sessions can be started.

To install it, use the Ubuntu Software Center or type the following command in a terminal window:

sudo apt-get install terminator

To start the program, tap the “Super” key, type “terminator” and click the Terminator icon. To start another session, right-click inside the terminator window and click “Split Horizontally” or “Split Vertically”. Repeat the process to split another pane and so on.

via Get the Most from Your Terminal with Tabs and Other Customizations.

PPA-Purge: How to Roll Back Major Installations in Ubuntu

Screenshot from 2014-05-11 15:02:54If your helping with testing new features in the development version of ubuntu, or trying out a new Desktop Environment, you will likely encounter installing new packages from a ppa. But what happens when you want to roll back those changes?

Thankfully there is a tool to help called ppa-purge. PPA-purge will uninstall all packages from a specified ppa and downgrade you back to the archive versions. In addition it will disable the ppa so you can’t install packages from it.

Installation

sudo apt-get install ppa-purge

How to use

Simply execute the following line, replace the ppa:NAMEOFPPA with the ppa you wish to purge.

sudo ppa-purge ppa:NAMEOFPPA

I’ll show you a quick example of me removing the HUD ppa:

sudo ppa-purge ppa:unity-team/hudUpdating packages lists

PPA to be removed: unity-team hud

comm: file 2 is not in sorted order

Package revert list generated:

gir1.2-dbusmenu-glib-0.4/precise gir1.2-dbusmenu-gtk-0.4/precise

indicator-appmenu/precise libdbusmenu-glib4/precise libdbusmenu-gtk3-4/precise

libdbusmenu-gtk4/precise libunity-core-5.0-5/precise unity/precise

unity-common/precise unity-services/precise

Disabling unity-team PPA from

/etc/apt/sources.list.d/unity-team-hud-precise.list

The following packages will be DOWNGRADED:

gir1.2-dbusmenu-glib-0.4 gir1.2-dbusmenu-gtk-0.4 libdbusmenu-glib4

libdbusmenu-gtk3-4 libdbusmenu-gtk4 indicator-appmenu

Note that it found the packages I had installed and offered to downgrade them. Say yes and ppa-purge will put you back to archive state. Neat!

via PPA-Purge: the magic undo buttton | The Orange Notebook.