Introducing Betty, the Siri for the Linux Terminal

Betty is like Siri or Google Now for the command line. Well, sort of. The tool translates plain English into commands: it displays the command it runs and obviously, the command output, in the terminal. It can even speak the command output.

Screenshot from 2014-05-16 14:31:26

Betty’s mission is, according to its GitHub page, to “provide a way to use computers through natural language input“:

“Specifically, the benefit is being able to do things on your computer without leaving the command line or screwing around on the internet trying to find the right command. Betty just works“.

For example, if you can’t remember the exact compress and uncompress commands, you can simply ask Betty to do it:

betty uncompress archive.tar.gz

Of course, the commands supported by Betty at this time is pretty limited since the tool is under two weeks old, but it should improve quite fast since it’s not that hard to add new commands (and there are 17 contributors already).

Betty 0.1.5 supports a wide variety of commands, such as:

count (number of characters in a file, number of words in a directory, etc.);

config (change your name);

datetime (current time, date, etc.);

Find (find in files);

Internet / web queries (download some file, find out what’s the weather like, etc.);

file / directory operations (compress/uncompress files, show file size, change permissions, etc.);

processes;

user commands (what’s my username, real name, ip address, who else is logged in, etc.);

control iTunes and Spotify;

and much more.

A complete list of supported commands is available @ GitHub (under Documentation).

How to install Betty:

1. Install Ruby. In Ubuntu, install it using the following command:

sudo apt-get install ruby

2. Install git and download the latest Betty using the following commands:

sudo apt-get install git

3. And finally, you’ll have to add the path to the “betty/main.rb” file as an alias for “betty” in your ~/.bashrc file. Do this automatically (assuming you’ve downloaded Betty in your home folder!) by using the following commands:

echo “alias betty=\”~/betty/main.rb\”” >> ~/.bashrc
source ~/.bashrc

 

via Betty Is Like Siri Or Google Now For The Command Line (Translates Plain English Into Commands) | Best of Ubuntu.

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