Install Nemo 2.2.1 (With Unity Patches) In Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

Update for Ubuntu 14.04 users: I’ve updated Nemo (with Unity patches) as well as the Nemo extensions from the WebUpd8 Nemo PPA to the latest 2.2.0 version.

Screenshot from 2014-05-09 07:54:45

Nemo is the default Cinnamon file manager and normally, it needs Cinnamon to be installed, even if you want to use it in a desktop environment such as Unity or GNOME (Shell). The Nemo version in the WebUpd8 Nemo PPA uses some patches that make it work properly under Unity, without Cinnamon dependencies (the only dependency used is Cinnamon Translations). It should also work on other desktop environments, but some patches add extra Unity functionality and also I’ve only tested it under Unity.

Nemo 2.2.0 has received improvements such as: HiDPI support, a recent place sidebar item, tab switching using ctrl+(shift+)+tab, a new folder button was added to the toolbar and various bug fixes.

Install Nemo 2.2.0 in Ubuntu 14.04

Unfortunately, the latest Nemo 2.2.0 can’t be compiled successfully on Ubuntu versions older than 14.04, that’s why our PPA has Nemo 2.0.8 for Ubuntu 12.04, 12.10 and 13.10.

Important: if you’re using any Cinnamon PPA, you must purge it before using the PPA before. Also, don’t install this in Linux Mint!

To install Nemo 2.2.0 in Ubuntu 14.04, use the Nemo WebUpd8 PPA:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/nemo
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install nemo nemo-fileroller

If you already had an older Nemo version installed from our Nemo PPA, upgrade to the latest Nemo 2.2.0 using the following commands:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade
kill all
nemo

Then start Nemo from the Dash / menu (note that it shows up as “Files”, like Nautilus, but if you search for “Nemo”, the “Files” app that shows up should be Nemo).

The PPA also has some Nemo extensions, to install them, search for “nemo” in Ubuntu Software Center or Synaptic.

A lot more about Nemo: various tweaks, extensions, how to set Nemo as the default file manager in Ubuntu, etc., in our previous article: Install Nemo With Unity Patches (And Without Cinnamon Dependencies) In Ubuntu (I strongly suggest you read that article before installing Nemo!)

via Install Nemo 2.2.0 (With Unity Patches) In Ubuntu 14.04 LTS ~ Web Upd8: Ubuntu / Linux blog.

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Get the Most from Your Terminal with Tabs and Other Customizations

Modern Linux distributions try to shield users from the complexities of the command-line, but there are times when using a terminal is absolutely necessary. On Ubuntu, the default terminal is the GNOME terminal (“gnome-terminal“). To start it, tap the “Super” key (which is probably the Windows key on your keyboard), type “terminal” and then click on the Terminal icon.

The word terminal comes from a previous era in computing when the connection from a computer ended (terminated) at a character-based workstation. This concept itself comes from the field of electronics where a terminal is the the end of a line where signals are either transmitted or received. Today, the terminal program is a software equivalent of those character-based workstations.

For quick one-line commands, or a quick bit of system configuration, the default terminal settings are more than adequate; however, if you spend any length of time using the terminal, you may find that you want to customize it to better fit your needs.

The simplest customization is to change the dimensions of the terminal window. By default, the terminal window has twenty-four rows with each being eighty characters wide. You can change the size by dragging any of the edges or corners. This can be a bit haphazard, so the terminal program also offers some presets. Click Terminal on the menu bar and choose between 80×24 (the default), 80×43 (a long version of the default), 132×24 (wide) and 132×43 (wide and long).

If you need another terminal session, you can start one from the launcher, or you can right-click inside the terminal window and click “Open Terminal”. If you use the second method, then the current working directory is preserved. If you have several terminal windows open then you may find that your screen is getting a little cluttered. The solution is to open terminal tabs. To open a tab, right-click inside the terminal window and click “Open Tab”. The tabs appear at the top of the window, and the title of the tabs shows the current prompt: A combination of the username, the machine name and the current directory. Tabs can be closed by clicking on the X, by using “Close Tab” from the context menu or by exiting the shell with CTRL-D.

The terminal program also has the concept of a profile. This allows you to set different preferences and remember them in a profile. Each terminal session can use a different profile. To create a profile, select “New Profile …” under the ”’File” menu. To edit a profile’s preferences use ”Profile Preferences” under the Edit menu or right-click and select “Profile Preferences” under the Profiles sub-menu.

Among the preferences are the ability to change the default font and alter the amount of scroll history that is retained. You can also set the background color and make the background semi-transparent!

If you like the tabs on the Ubuntu terminal, then you might also be interested in another terminal program called Terminator. Like the default terminal program, it allows you to open multiple sessions, but rather than using tabs, it allows the terminal windows to be split horizontally or vertically. By splitting the window multiple times, several different terminal sessions can be started.

To install it, use the Ubuntu Software Center or type the following command in a terminal window:

sudo apt-get install terminator

To start the program, tap the “Super” key, type “terminator” and click the Terminator icon. To start another session, right-click inside the terminator window and click “Split Horizontally” or “Split Vertically”. Repeat the process to split another pane and so on.

via Get the Most from Your Terminal with Tabs and Other Customizations.

Install the Ubuntu-Studio Blue on Black (Adwaita) Theme in Ubuntu 12.04 – 14.04

Screenshot from 2014-05-07 19:21:49

I always loved the default Blue on Black look that came with Ubuntu Studio, but never really liked the Desktop Environment, so after a little digging and trial and error I’ve finally found out how easy it is to install this beautiful theme on Ununtu Unity, I’ve yet to test the theme on other flavours of Ubuntu, so if you guys ever try it out on, let’s say Kubuntu, or Lubuntu, come back and let me know how it works.

To Install Ubuntu Studio Blue on Black, enter the following command into your Terminal:

sudo apt-get install gnome-themes-standard

Once installed it’s just a matter of going to System Setting – Appearance and selecting the “Adwaita” option from the theme selection menu:

Screenshot from 2014-05-07 19:36:29

Installing this theme will also install the standard Icons for Ubuntu-Studio, which I kinda like, but if you prefer they can be changed to a different Icon theme using either Ubuntu-Tweak or the Unity Tweak tool.

Install or Upgrade to Kernel 3.14.3 in Ubuntu / Linux Mint

The latest stable Linux Kernel 3.14.3 has been announced by Greg Kroah-Hartman a few hours ago. All users of Kernel 3.14 series are urged to upgrade as soon as possible.

This tutorial will show you how to install or upgrade to this kernel release in Ubuntu 14.04, Ubuntu 13.10, Ubuntu 12.04 and Linux Mint.

Linux kernel 3.14.3 has gathered more drivers and a host of Arch improvements. See the changelog for details.

Install / Upgrade to Kernel 3.14.3:

For graphical way, download the .deb packages from kernel.ubuntu.com and double-click to install them via pop-up Ubuntu Software Center in the below order:

1. linux-headers-3.14.3-031403_3.14.3-xxxx_all.deb

2. linux-headers-3.14.3-031403-generic_3.14.0-xxxx_i386(or amd64).deb

3. linux-image-3.14.3-031403-generic_3.14.0-xxxx_i386(or amd64).deb

For command line way, press Ctrl+Alt+T on keyboard to open terminal. When it opens, follow the steps below:

1. For 32 bit system, download .deb packages by entering the following commands in Terminal:

Enter these commands for 64 bit system:

2. Install the downloaded packages with these commands:

sudo dpkg -i linux-headers-3.14.3-*.deb linux-image-3.14.3-*.deb

3. If you’re using a proprietary driver, you may rebuild (or re-install) it to make it work with the new kernel.

Finally restart your computer.

Uninstall:

If for some reason this kernel release doesn’t work properly for you, reboot into previous kernel (Grub -> Advanced -> select previous kernel) and run this command to remove Linux Kernel 3.14:

sudo apt-get remove linux-headers-3.14.3-* linux-image-3.14.3-*

Finally reboot your computer.

via Install or Upgrade to Kernel 3.14.3 in Ubuntu / Linux Mint | UbuntuHandbook.

Create a Multiboot Live USB Drive in Ubuntu with Multisystem

With all the different distros and flavours of Linux out there it can be hard to choose which one you want, thankfully making that choice can be relatively easy if you create a bootable drive with 3 or 4 live distro loaded on it, and have a handy menu to boot into each one. Here’s how to do that very thing in an Ubuntu based Linux:

First off download the Multisystem installation script from here. Once you have it downloaded, extract it to any convenient folder of your choosing and double click on the install-depot-multisystem.sh script and follow the on-screen instructions.

Once you have it installed it will tell you that the program can be found in the “Accessories” menu, but it’s easy enough to find and run it through the unity scope by typing “multi” like so:

multi1

Once it has started select the USB drive from the opening menu and click confirm:

Screenshot from 2014-05-01 19:37:37

Next, you will be presented with the following screen:

Screenshot from 2014-05-01 19:39:33

At this point it’s a good idea to open up the location where you have saved the iso files (which, I’m assuming you have already downloaded) and have the window to the side, so it is then just a matter of dragging and dropping the iso into the dialogue like so:

Screenshot from 2014-05-01 19:43:35

As soon as you drop the file a Terminal window will open asking for your password, enter your password and sit back and finish your coffee while Multisystem does all the hard work.

To add other iso files, it’s just a simple process of dragging and dropping each one into the same dialogue, the most I’ve ever had on one is four and I’m not sure how many it could take.

To boot from the usb drive, simply hit F11 as your computer boots up and and select your usb drive, you will then be presented with the Multisystem boot menu with your iso files listed at the top, from there it’s just a matter of selecting your chosen distro and letting it boot, simples.

How To Install And Tweak GNOME Flashback Session In Ubuntu 14.04

Screenshot - 190414 - 08:44:08

For years Gnome has been a favourite Desktop Environment among Linux users everywhere. But with the introduction of Unity within Ubuntu the veteran Ubuntu users started to panick. But now it is possible to get a Gnome2 Desktop Environment back with a few easy commands and programs. Here’s how:

1. Install the Flashback GNOME session:

To install the Flashback GNOME session, use the following command:

sudo apt-get install gnome-session-flashback

Once installed, log out and select this from the login screen session menu: “GNOME Flashback (Compiz)” if you want to use Compiz or “GNOME Flashback (Metacity)” if you don’t need Compiz and want to use Metacity:

2. Fix the Compiz Flashback session:

For GNOME Flashback Compiz session only: In my test, logging into the “GNOME Flashback (Compiz)” session, there were no window decorations. But I was able to fix it so if that also occurs on your system, here’s what to do. Firstly, install CompizConfig Settings Manager:

sudo apt-get install compizconfig-settings-manager

Then launch CompizConfig Settings Manager from the menu (Applications > System Tools > Preferences), enable the “Copy to texture” plugin, then log out and log back in.

If the window decorations still don’t work, you can also try to disable all the plugins from CompizConfig Settings Manager and then re-enable them (remember not to enable the Ubuntu Unity Plugin!).

3. How to add applets to the panel:

To add applets to the panel, you must hold the ALT key while right clicking the panel, then select “Add to panel”. In some cases, you must hold down both the ALT and the Super (Windows) keys while right clicking the panel so try this if just holding ALT doesn’t work.

Screenshot from 2014-04-19 08:46:304. Getting a Unity-like appmenu (global menu):

If you want to get an Unity-like AppMenu (global menu), install the following package:

sudo apt-get install indicator-applet-appmenu

Then add the “Indicator Applet Appmenu” to the top panel (I’ve already explained above how to add applets to the GNOME Flashback session panels):

Note that in my test, adding the Appmenu applet to a panel makes the “Menu bar” applet disappear for some reason. The solution for this is use the “Main Menu” applet or Cardapio (see step 5 below).

5. Get a searchable menu: Cardapio:

Cardapio, a menu that comes with a search along with other useful features, doesn’t work with Ubuntu 14.04 any more, but I’ve found a version fixed by Eugene San fixed for Python 2.7 to which I’ve added a few fixes myself:

fixed the GTK3 bookmarks path;

fixed GNOME session logout/shutdown;

fixed panel icon not being displayed

fixed panel icon padding Cardapio using the wrong icon;

fixed “Applet” tab in Cardapio preferences not being displayed in GNOME Flashback session.

I’m not a developer so I couldn’t fix all the bugs: some of its plugins don’t work any more and launching Cardapio using the keyboard shortcut, the menu is displayed in the middle of the screen instead of being displayed where it’s supposed to – next to the panel (if you manage to fix this, let me know!).

You can install it in Ubuntu 14.04 by using the following commands:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:nilarimogard/webupd8
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install cardapio cardapio-gnomepanel

Then, add Cardapio to the panel (see step 3 for how to add applets to the panel) and configure it to your liking. Note that after changing some settings, such as the ones in the “Applet” tab, you need to remove the applet from the panel and re-add it for the changes to take effect (or log out and log back in).

via How To Install And Tweak GNOME Flashback Session In Ubuntu 14.04 | Best of Ubuntu.