Early Preview of Gnome Shell 3.14 On Ubuntu GNOME 14.10

GNOME 3.14 is releasing in September and Ubuntu-GNOME in October, therefore this is an early access to the development versions of both of them. However Ubuntu development releases are quite stable and the same also applies for GNOME, so it should be a very usable system.

Running GNOME in Ubuntu won’t give a genuine GNOME experience and not all things work as supposed to, but on the other hand Ubuntu will give you the best out of Linux desktop the term is wrong in general, meaning easy access to all available software, free and no-free. Something you should keep on mind if you prefer GNOME over Unity is that is recommended to install Ubuntu GNOME and not Ubuntu and install GNOME after. The interplay of the two desktops when we add GNOME PPAs is really bad. Also getting GNOME from official PPAs of Ubuntu, it is a poor GNOME “clone” and additionally it would be an old version too. It isn’t very good idea to make a judgement out of it. It isn’t even a worth to try it like this.

Get latest GNOME On Ubuntu GNOME

That involves three steps. Download Ubuntu GNOME, add PPAs and reboot.

You will need to download one of the daily Ubuntu GNOME images. To burn the ISO you can watch this YouTube guide.

Prefer the 64bit architecture and if you have an UEFI, boot the USB from there. Install as normal and update the system.

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade

Every time that upgrade will keep packages back, try dist-upgrade.

sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

Then add the PPAs.

We are going to use the bleeding edge snapshots. Two things.

  1. Read the details on PPAs
  2. You have to know how to use ppa-purge and apt-get

PPA-purge disables a PPA and reverts to the official packages if applicable. The syntax is very simple

sudo ppa-purge the-PPA-to-remove

The PPAs you need to add are:

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:gnome3-team/gnome3
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:gnome3-team/gnome3-staging
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:ricotz/testing

After that, update

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade //or dist-upgrade

You’re done, just reboot!


Overall

GNOME is depended in some degree on GNOME-Software, and GNOME-Software isn’t available in repositories. GNOME Software helps us to create Application-Folders in Shell, makes applications easily discover-able from Shell through a search provider, and more.

ubuntu-software-center

 

In general there are some smaller issues as well (eg theming, gsettings, super+right click, and others), missing software and not all GNOME modules aren’t updated to the latest (yet). Ofcourse this is still an early release (technically not even release!).

For now just a screencast. Open Source and proprietary in perfect harmony with a single click in Ubuntu!

Ubuntu GNOME with the Testing PPAs at the moment has many many bugs concerning GNOME implementation that don’t happen for example in Fedora 21.


A last thing you should know is that GNOME 3.14 is going to bring huge improvements, so it is a worth to update to it.

As a matter of fact is always important to update on the latest desktop releases no matter what Linux desktop you’re using. They all do bring many many improvements that make your life easier. Easier means less nerves -happier 🙂

via Early Preview | Shell 3.14 On Ubuntu GNOME 14.10 | woGue.

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Faience Theme now available for Ubuntu 14.04

 

Screenshot from 2014-06-09 08:48:00

Faience Theme is a Gnome Shell theme created by tiheum, the owners of the most popular theme, Faenza and Faience icon themes. According to the developer, Faience is a Work In Progress that include GTK3, GTK2, Metacity and Gnome-Shell themes and an icon theme based on Faenza, so if you encounter any bugs or issues with the installation or use, submit a comment with the developer.

The latest Faience theme release 0.7  comes with a Flatter look, it’s compatible with Gnome 3.10 and it comes in three variants; Faience, Faience Claire and Ocre.Support Gnome 3.10 only needs Murrine GTK2 and Unico GT3 engines to work properly.

Gnome-shell and icon themes are available to install via a PPA repository, install it by the following commands into your terminal:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:tiheum/equinox
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install faience-theme

 

Use Unity Tweak Tool or Ubuntu Tweak to set the theme

via Faience Theme now available for Ubuntu 14.04 | Sysads Gazette.

The Linux Foundation’s Free “Intro to Linux” course – Beginning 1st August 2014

The-Linux-Foundation

On March 6, the Linux Foundation announced it is building a Massive Open Online Course MOOC program with edX, the nonprofit, open source based, online learning platform launched in 2012 by Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT. The course: LFS101x is based on the popular LFS101: Introduction to Linux, with modifications which reflect the fact that it will be 100% self-paced. LFS101x will be available entirely free of charge and as open enrollment, meaning that students can start the course at any time. We expect this course to become available during late Summer 2014 and users may pre-register on the course page at the edX website.

Since the original release of the above information a start date (1st August 2014) has been confirmed and here’s a special welcome video from Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux:

Details of the Syllabus below:

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Introducing Betty, the Siri for the Linux Terminal

Betty is like Siri or Google Now for the command line. Well, sort of. The tool translates plain English into commands: it displays the command it runs and obviously, the command output, in the terminal. It can even speak the command output.

Screenshot from 2014-05-16 14:31:26

Betty’s mission is, according to its GitHub page, to “provide a way to use computers through natural language input“:

“Specifically, the benefit is being able to do things on your computer without leaving the command line or screwing around on the internet trying to find the right command. Betty just works“.

For example, if you can’t remember the exact compress and uncompress commands, you can simply ask Betty to do it:

betty uncompress archive.tar.gz

Of course, the commands supported by Betty at this time is pretty limited since the tool is under two weeks old, but it should improve quite fast since it’s not that hard to add new commands (and there are 17 contributors already).

Betty 0.1.5 supports a wide variety of commands, such as:

count (number of characters in a file, number of words in a directory, etc.);

config (change your name);

datetime (current time, date, etc.);

Find (find in files);

Internet / web queries (download some file, find out what’s the weather like, etc.);

file / directory operations (compress/uncompress files, show file size, change permissions, etc.);

processes;

user commands (what’s my username, real name, ip address, who else is logged in, etc.);

control iTunes and Spotify;

and much more.

A complete list of supported commands is available @ GitHub (under Documentation).

How to install Betty:

1. Install Ruby. In Ubuntu, install it using the following command:

sudo apt-get install ruby

2. Install git and download the latest Betty using the following commands:

sudo apt-get install git

3. And finally, you’ll have to add the path to the “betty/main.rb” file as an alias for “betty” in your ~/.bashrc file. Do this automatically (assuming you’ve downloaded Betty in your home folder!) by using the following commands:

echo “alias betty=\”~/betty/main.rb\”” >> ~/.bashrc
source ~/.bashrc

 

via Betty Is Like Siri Or Google Now For The Command Line (Translates Plain English Into Commands) | Best of Ubuntu.

How to Capture a Screenshot of Your LightDM Login Screen (Unity Greeter) in Ubuntu

This quick tutorial is going to show you how to capture LightDM Unity Greeter, the log in screen, in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.

Besides installing Ubuntu as a guest OS via Virtualbox or VMware Player, there’s no graphical screenshot tool to capture the log-in screen.

However, there’s simple script can do this job and below picture was taken by this method:

loginscreen

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